Information contained on this site is general information only. The authors do not guarantee that the information is without flaw of any kind or
wholly appropriate for your purposes and therefore disclaims all liability for any error, loss or consequence which may arise as a result of you relying
on this information. The height & width of
plants can be variable. Plants from none local gene stock may exceed the dimensions listed below.



Click on the images for larger view

 

Lightwood
Acacia implexa

Flowers: October to January.

 

 

H 5-8m x W 2-4m.

Graceful small to medium tree with attractive curved light-green leaves & rough bark. Flowers in dense clusters of cream-yellow balls during summer & sometimes again in autumn. Prefers well drained sandy soils. Will establish itself if planted in very shaded positions. Long-lived & drought tolerant. Has the potential to be planted more widely as a suburban tree. Canopy is compact & open. For maximum visual effect plant Lightwood in groups.

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Sallow Wattle
Acacia longifolia subsp. longifolia


Flowers: June to November.

 


H 1.5-10m x W 6-10m.

Commonly an erect shrub to medium tree with light-green leaves & lemon-yellow flower spikes. Prefers well drained sandy soils. Reasonably long-lived & drought tolerant. Has the potential to be planted more widely as a suburban tree. Sallow Wattle is similar to it close cousin Coast Wattle & are often confused with each other. Given the time to grow to maturity Sallow Wattle can make a superb garden tree.

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Black Wattle
Acacia mearnsii


Flowers: September to November.

 


H 5-10+m x W 6-10m.

Fast growing medium-sized tree with dark bark, feathery foliage & masses of yellow flower clusters in late winter to early spring. Suits most well-drained sites but dislikes saline or waterlogged soils. Short-lived, averaging 10 to 15 years. Considered to be a good pioneering plant, regenerating poor soils as it builds nitrogen. Also noted as a good suppresser of understorey growth, making it a good fire retarding tree.

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Blackwood
Acacia melanoxylon

Flowers June to October.

 

 

H 5-10m x W 4-6m.

Quick growing upright tree with hard brown fissured bark & attractive foliage, producing masses of creamy white flowers in winter. Grows in both wet & dry locations on well drained soils. Blackwood is an excellent tree to plant for shade and shelter. Short lived if conditions are harsh. Can be subject to mistletoe, fungi & borer infestation. Considered to be slight to moderately saline tolerate.

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Golden Wattle
Acacia pycnantha


Flowers: July to October.


H 3-10m x W 2-9m.

Fast growing and drought tolerant small to medium sized shrub/tree produces a mass of fragrant fluffy golden flowers. Generally lives less than 15 years & prefers well drained areas. Pruning while young encourages denser growth. On 1st September 1988 the Golden Wattle was officially proclaimed as Australia's national floral emblem.

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Black Sheoke
Allocasuarina littoralis

Flowers:March to June.

 



H 4-8m x W 2-5m.

Slender medium to tall tree preferring any well-drained positions. Relatively fast growing if conditions are suitable & watered during summer. Known for its fine soft branchlets that function as leaves that resemble pine needles. When shed the foliage forms a dense mat that effectively suppresses undergrowth. Bark is black & fissured. Female flowers are small & dark red, male flowers brown, usually occurring on separate trees. Female trees forms attractive seed cones. Black Sheoke rarely sheds branches & is very drought tolerant once established.

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Drooping or Coast Sheoke Allocasuarina verticillata

Flowers: March to December.




H 4-11m x W 3-6+m.

Small to medium spreading tree with beautiful drooping foliage. The dry sandy coastal soils being its natural or preferred habitat, salt spray tolerant. Individual male & female plants, with the male tree developing yellow-brown pollen spikes giving the tree an attractive hue. The female tree forms barrel shaped woody cones. An excellent shade tree once established & highly drought tolerant. Shed foliage forms a weed smothering soft carpet.

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Silver Banksia
Banksia marginata

Flowers: September - April.

 

 


H 1-8m x W 1-5m.

Typically a medium shrub growing to about 2 metres in height with a similar width, suited to moist well drained soils in sunny to part shade positions, but can withstand some winter water logging. It's numerous yellow or golden green flowers are rich in nectar & attract birds & insects. Drought resistant once established & noted as an effective screening plant that tolerates some pruning that will promote new growth & denser foliage. A very hardy & long-lived species.

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Sweet Bursaria
Bursaria spinosa var. macrophylla

Flowers: December to January.




H 4-6m x W 2-4m.

Sweet Bursaria grows to a shrub or small tree with those closer to the coast growing taller with fewer and sometimes no spines. Leaves are small; shiny and dark-green. Flowering with dense clusters of fragrant white flowers, going on to form attractive bronze coloured seed pods. Sweet Bursaria is a favourite with birds & butterflies. It makes an excellent garden tree if given an appropriate position & the time to establish. Bursaria spinosa var. spinosa differs from Bursaria spinosa var. macrophylla with shorter leaves. Both are long lived.

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Eucalyptus species

Pre-settlement there were seven or possibly eight species of eucalypt or gum tree that grew across the sandbelt region. Looking at the remnant trees; there seems to be no overall rule to which species of tree grew where. Although observations generally point to River Red Gums, Swamp Gums, & Silver-leafed Stringybark preferred the wetter or heavier soils, with the other gums found on drier better drained & more nutrient poor soils. However the mixing of species is also evident. Regardless, all remnant eucalyptus trees are rare, with the Red Gums being the most common. This is likely to their long lifespan of many hundreds of years. Remnant Yellow Box being very rare; down to a handful of trees in Highett. Remnant Snow Gums found only on a few site are dying possibly due to the drying climate conditions. Planting trees is important as they are a key species in providing primary habitat for birds & mammals & insects, if you have ample room to plant a tree, please consider planting an indigenous eucalypt trees.

River Red Gum
Eucalyptus camaldulensis var. camaldulensis

Flowers: November to March.




H 12-30m x W 15-20m.

An iconic tree that is widely distributed across mainland Australia. The River Red Gum grows mainly along waterways & in & around wetlands areas, preferring deep sandy/alluvial soils. Mature trees host an enormous number & variety of animal and insect species. Long-lived & will need plenty of room spread, usually unsuitable for most garden situations. River Red Gums take a hundred or more years to reach their full size. The River Red Gum in the image opposite is hundreds of years old & predates any European settlement in Australia

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Silver-leafed Stringybark
Eucalyptus cephalocarpa


Flowers: January - July.

 



H 8-15m. x W up to 10m.

Medium size tree, usually under 15m tall, often stunted & crooked if the growing conditions are harsh. Silver-leafed Stringbark grows in poorly drained sandy sites tolerating moderate water logging. The dense grey-green foliage thins on older trees. Thick soft & fibrous grey-brown bark persists to the upper branches, typical of peppermint gums. Juvenile leaves are a dull grey-green & round or ovate in shape. White/cream flowers attract birds.

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Yellow Box
Eucalyptus melliodora

Flowers: October to March.




H 10-25m x W 8-20m.

Medium to tall tree with a spreading canopy, preferring well drained light clay & sandy soils. Can be variable within the species with trunk bark becomes dark and rough with age, with its upper branches pale and creamy. Drought tolerant & can be very long-lived. Considered to be one of the best honey trees. The showy flowers are white to cream, attracting honey-eaters & parrots throughout its flowering period. Remnant Yellow Box are now very rare, with only a few trees remaining across the Sandbelt region.

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Swamp Gum
Eucalyptus ovata var. ovata

Flowers: March to July.





H 8-30m x W 8-20m.

Spreading or upright tree that is well suited to growing on water-logged sandy soils or light clays. The upper bark sheds in ribbons, leaving branches creamy to grey in colour, while rough bark persists on the trunk. Flowers are creamy white & juvenile leaves are roundish or ovate in shape, longer & thinner as they age. Ovata is one of the Koala's favourite food trees. Swamp Gum can reach 30m, but generally very much shorter in the wetter areas.

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Narrow-Leaved Peppermint
Eucalyptus radiata ssp. radiata

Flowers: October - January.

 


H 10-15m x W up to 10+m.

Usually a upright compact tree with a fibrous bark persistent to its higher branches. Small creamy white flowers in spring to early January. Leaves are long & narrow. Adaptable to wide variety of soils types, but prefers well drained sandy soils & tolerates only moderate water-logging. E. radiata is becoming popular in urban areas & is increasingly being used as a street tree because of its compact dense canopy & medium height and excellent form. Leaves have a peppermint smell when crushed.

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Snow Gum
Eucalyptus pauciflora ssp. pauciflora

Flowers: October to January.




H 5-12+m x W 6-10m.

Small to medium tree, can be variable in size & form. Prefers well drained moist soils. Sheds bark to ground level; creating its trademark pale & patterned trunk. Long-lived & hardy. Blooming profusely with beautiful creamy flowers, followed by its large distinctive gum nuts. Leaves are large & leathery. Noted as a good garden & honey tree for the sandbelt region. Remnant snow gums have become very rare across the sandbelt region.
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Coast Manna-gum

Eucalyptus viminalis ssp. pryoriana

Flowers: Flowers: March - May.

 

 

H 12m x W 12+m.

Attractive spreading tree growing to about 12 metres high. Moderately dense canopy, thinning on older trees, The bark is fibrous & rough persisting to the smaller twigs. Grows best in dry or moist well drained sandy soils & is tolerant of periodic water-logging. Flowers are creamy-yellow in colour. Once widespread across the Elster Creek catchment now mainly restricted to a few reserves in the region.

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Swamp Paperbark
Melaleuca ericifolia

Flowers: October to November.





H 2-8m - W 2-3m.

Erect, small tree with fine, soft foliage, occurring naturally along water courses & wetlands being very prominent throughout water-logged areas. Very hardy & drought tolerant tree. Pale papery bark & fragrant creamy-yellow bottlebrush-like flowers with dense fine foliage makes for an attractive screening tree that takes well to pruning. Planting in groups improves the aesthetic & habitat value of this Melaleuca tree.

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Spike Wattle
Acacia oxycedrus


Flowers: August to November.

 



H 1-2+ m x W 1-2m.

An erect or spreading prickly shrub growing to 2 or more metres in height, though is generally smaller on the sandbelt. Prefers sandy soils but is adaptable & withstands short periods of water inundation & drought. Attractive cylindrical flowers are a very bright creamy-yellow in colour. Extremely prickly, making it a suitable shelter habitat for small birds. Noted for its showy flowering, being one of the best flowerers in the Wattle family.

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Hop Wattle
Acacia stricta

Flowers: May to October.

 

 

H 3m x W 3+m.

Erect or spreading shrub to 3+ metres with smooth bark; branchlets angled or flattened. Grows in most soil types; in reasonably well drained positions, often on moist sites, in full sun to part shade. When planted in groups Hop Wattle forms an effective screen & windbreak that doesn't grow too tall or turn straggly. Fast growing and tolerant of dry conditions.

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Sweet Wattle
Acacia suaveolens

Flowers: April to October.



H 1-2+m x W 1-2m.

Sender reasonably fast gowning shrub, often open & spreading in form. Flowering in winter with sweetly perfumed pale yellow flowers. Its leaves are long & narrow. Prefers well drained soils & is suited to full sun to partial shaded positions. Selective tip pruning encourages a more vigorous leaf growth & a denser shrub. Noted as being salt tolerant. The Latin word suaveolens means sweet smelling.

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Prickly Moses
Acacia verticillata
var. verticillata

Flowers: June to October.


H 2-3+m x W 2-3m.

Open erect shrub with slender branches. Prefers dry to moist well drained soils, tolerating some water-logging. Flowers are attractive & profuse among the whorls of prickly phyllodes [modified leaves]. Its open form allows plenty of light through to smaller plants below or around its margins. Takes well to periodic light pruning. Good small bird habitat.

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Swamp Sheoke

Allocasuarina paludosa

Flowers: March - October.



H 50cm-2m x W 1-2m.

Open sprawling shrub prefers well drained, moist & sandy soils or light clays in full sun to shaded positions. Adapted to drier soils & is drought resistant. Female plants have small dark-red flowers & develop small seed cones, while males produces brown flowers on the end of the branchlets. Long-lived shrub with attractive soft foliage that is sufficiently open to allow for the establishment of smaller plants beneath it.

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Broom Spurge
Amperea xiphoclada


Flowers: September to February.





H 80cm x W 50cm.

An attractive erect & rigid small plant with sculptured grass-like foliage, usually leafless in its mature form. Found across the sandbelt region on the sandy soils, but will adapt to a range of soils types from coastal to inland areas. Very hardy species, well suited to rockeries & bush-gardens especially in lighter soils. Looks v/good planted in group. While it has small insignificant flowers, it is worthwhile plant for its foliage alone.

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Silver Banksia
Banksia marginata

Flowers: September to April.



H 1-5m x W 1-3m.

A variable species, typically a medium shrub to about 2 metres high on the sandbelt. Forms a dense shrub & flourishes in full sun to semi-shade. Prefers dry soil types & does not tolerate phosphorus soils. The upper surface of the leaf is a dull green & the under surface silvery, giving the plant its common name. Flowering is from early spring to autumn. A very hardy & long-lived species.

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Showy Bossiaea

Bossiaea cinerea

Flowers: July to December.







H 1-1.5m x W 1-1.5m.

Known for its showy display of yellow & red pea flowers & fine decorative foliage. Spectacular when in full flower, especially when grown in an open sunny position. Requires well drained soils on dry or well drained moist sites, with full sun to partial shade. Often difficult to establish requiring protection from disturbance & regular watering over its first summer. Once established B.cinerea is a very hardy shrub that responds well to occasional light pruning. Protect the root zone from disturbances.

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Common Cassinia - Dogwood
Cassinia aculeata

Flowers: November to March.




H 2-4m x W 1-2+.

Fast growing & upright, medium to tall shrub, preferring wetter & heavier soil types. Dark green narrow leaves that grow to about 50mm in length, with crowded heads of small whitish flowers. Long lived & drought tolerant & takes well to pruning.

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Drooping Cassinia
Cassinia arcuata

Flowers: November to February.





H 1-3m x W 1-2m.

Attractive graceful fast growing aromatic shrub with small narrow leaves on slender branches. Numerous small seeds with a fluffy appearance are produced in late spring. C. arcuata has a very delicious spicy aroma. Removing the old flowerheads will promote flowering & a more dense shrub. Needs well-drained soils and will benefit from supplementary watering during establishment.

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Common Everlasting
Chrysocephalum apiculatum

Flowers: September to December.


H 30cm x W 1- 2m.

A very variable species with attractive yellow flowers cluster at the ends of the stems. Flowers mainly during late-spring to summer, but it is not unusual to see flowers at other times of the year. Needs a well drained sunny position & is suitable for growing in containers.

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Common Correa

Correa reflexa var. reflexa


Flowers: May to September.






H 0.5-2m x W 1-2m.

Fast growing dense shrub, mostly grown from cuttings & care needs to be taken when planting due to the delicate root system. Suited to dry or well drained moist soils. Grows in sunny open positions to shaded areas. Flowers can vary from red to green. Correa is a good choice for planting near paths & driveways, with its soft foliage, that takes very readily to pruning.  Usually grows to less than its 2m height, making it a excellent understorey plant to establish near trees or larger shrubs. The young plants should be protected & kept moist with supplementary watering until established.

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Smooth or Heath Parrot-pea
Dillwynia glaberrima


Flowers: September to December
.



H 1-2m x W 1-2m.


An attractive hardy shrub which grows well in most soils with dense clusters of showy yellow flowers with red markings & narrow leaves. This shrub likes well drained soils in full sun to semi shaded areas. Has a very long flowering duration.

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Common Heath
Epacris impressa

Flowers: May to November.






H 1.5m x W 20-60cm.

A beautiful shrub worthy of cultivation usually growing to a metre or more in height. Branches are stiff & have small leaves that are pointed. Flowers are tubular shaped and red to white or pink in colour, and are sometimes densely packed in clusters at the end of the stems or spaced along the stems. Well drained position in semi shade or full sun is preferred. Can be hard to establish so protect from disturbance, although a tough little plant once established. Keep moist throughout the first summer. Pruning overcomes its natural straggly habit. The pink form of E. impressa is the floral emblem of Victoria.

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Yellow Hakea
Hakea nodosa

Flowers: April to August.




H 1-3m x W 1-2m.

Tolerates most soil types, including clay & sandy soils. Soft leaves & masses of yellow flowers make it an effective hiding & feeding place for small nectar seeking birds. Following flowering, it produces woody seed capsules. Regular light pruning helps to maintain a regular shape & produce denser foliage. Yellow Hakea tolerates dry positions & is not long-lived.

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Silky Hakea, or Needlebush
Hakea sericea

Flowers: May to September.




H 2-5m x W 1-3m.

Large shrub 3+ metres, usually less on the dry well drained soils on the sandbelt. Adaptable to most soils & situations. Very pointy leaves. Large woody seed capsules are retained on the bush Useful protection for small nectar seeking birds. Short-lived less than 15 years.

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Shiny Everlasting
Xerochrysum viscosum


Flowers: August to April.





H 50cm x W 30cm to 1m.

An attractive plant with showy flowers with papery petals. Flowers retain colour once dried & can be used in long-lasting floral displays. Excellent for borders & rockeries. Prefers to grow in sunny to part shade positions & will tolerate most well drained soils. Can be short-lived, extra water in summer and winter pruning can extend its life span. Keep moist until established.

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Silky Guinea-flower
Hibbertia sericea

Flowers: can be variable : peaking
October to December.


H 30cm -1m x W 60cm.

Small erect shrub with attractive foliage that produces profuse yellow flowers. Prefers well drained sandy soils in full sun to part shady positions. Long-lived but can be a little difficult to establish, so keep protect from disturbance, & moist during establishment.

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Hop Goodenia
Goodenia ovata

Flowers: August to February.






H 1-1.5m x W 1-3m.

Fast growing hardy plant that grows in full sun to shady positions. Bright yellow flowers persist most of the year with attractive serrated leaves along its trailing stems. Very drought resistant, as well as tolerating wetter areas. Very effective for quick in-fill planting, coping well with foot traffic & pruning. Ideal for large pots & hanging baskets. Requires room to spread to its full 3 metre diameter. Can be contained by pruning.

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Austral Indigo
Indigofera australis

Flowers: September to December.









H 1-2m x W 1-2m.

Slender upright shrub of the Pea family. Likes well drained moist sandy soils in a sunny to semi-shady position. Flowers with spectacular show of mauve to purple flowers. Attractive blue-green foliage through the winter months. Adaptable to most soil types. Reasonably drought tolerant once established. Can be short lived if the planting position is too dry or waterlogged. Supplementary summer watering improves the vigor and density of flowers & more luxuriant foliage. After flowering the shrub produces shiny bright-green pods. Noted as taking well to some light pruning.

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Burgan
Kunzea ericoides

Flowers: November to February.





H 2-5m x W 1-4m.

A large shrub to 3+ metres on the sandbelt taller elsewhere. Prefers an open position in moist soil tolerating dry sites. Flowers in an attractive mass of small white flowers. Has soft foliage & attractive seed capsules. Quick growing, long lived & hardy. Can grow & flower well in shady areas flowering best in open sunny areas. Can be pruned to keep neat. Considered an invasive plant in some areas.

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Prickly Tea-tree
Leptospermum continentale

Flowers: October to March.



H 1-1.5+m x W 1-1.5+m.

Fast growing hardy plant that grows in full sun to shady positions. Does well on poorly drained soils & is adaptable to most soil types & moisture conditions. Prickly leaves with attractive white flowers flowering over a long period. Position away from paths and areas where people will come into contact with its pungent leaves.

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Woolly Tea-tree
Leptospermum lanigerum

Flowers: September to January.





H 2-6m - W 1-3m.

Wooly Tea-tree makes a attractive garden plant usually reaching 2 or more metres. Grows in moist to wetter soils; preferring full sun or partial shade; withstanding dry periods. Flowers are followed by woody seed capsules which remain unopened until they drop from the plant or the plant dies. Regular pruning makes a denser shrub.

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Heath or Silky Tea-tree
Leptospermum myrsinoides

Flowers: September to November.


H 0.5 -2.5m x W 1m.

Attractive twiggy small-leafed shrub with pure white to pink flowers. Grows well in moist to dry heathland soils. Full sun to semi shade but flowering best on the drier sandy sites in full sun positions. Makes a good hedge plant, pruning can be beneficial.

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Common Beard-heath
Leucopogon virgatus

Flowers: July to December.





H 1m x W 60cm.

Small erect shrub with dark-green pointy leaves, producing masses of attractive tiny white flowers. Prefers well drained soils in full sun to partial shade. Hard to purchase from local nurseries, but would make an ideal addition to any bushland garden or rockery. Takes well to light pruning to bring on new growth.

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Scented Paperbark
Melaleuca squarrosa

Flowers: September to February.



H 2-4m - W 1-8m.

Usually an erect shrub or small tree with dark green ovate leaves arranged in pairs opposite each other along slender branches. During spring & summer it displays scented creamy white bottlebrush flowers. Adaptable to most soils & conditions as it is often found in dry forests & in swamps or along watercourses. Tolerant of dry conditions once established. Noted as taking well to pruning.

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Twiggy Daisy-bush
Olearia ramulosa


Flowers: September to June.





H 1-2m x W 1.5m.

Small to medium open, sometimes sprawling shrub with tiny aromatic leaves and masses of white (more common) or mauve flowers. Long flowering period from from spring to late autumn or winter. Prefers well drained soils, even primary dune areas. Takes well to pruning after the flowers fade, stopping the plant from becoming straggly & can prolong the flowering. Propagates readily from cuttings. Good understorey plant.

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Handsome Flat-pea
Platylobium formosum

Flowers: September to December.




H 60cm-1+m x W 1m.

Straggly, understorey shrub with wiry scrambling stems. Very showy when in flower, although not often cultivated. Regarded as a hardy species for moist shady sites but requires good drainage. Attractive large flat seed pods after flowering. Drought resistant.

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Common Flat-pea
Platylobium obtusangulum

Flowers: September to December.

H 30cm - 1.5m x W 1-1.5m

Wiry stemmed trailing shrub with very attractive yellow & red pea-flowers & distinctive triangular shaped leaves. Prefers drier light soils, sunny or semi-shade positions. Mixes well with other shrubs & grasses, trailing & growing through without dominating. Long lived & drought resistant.

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Clustered Bush-pea
Pultenaea dentata

Flowers: September to November.



H 0.3 -1m x W 0.5m.

Very attractive small slender twiggy shrub, with narrow, leaves & yellow and red tinged flowers in tight groups at end of stems. Requires moist well drained soils. Sunny to semi-shaded areas suite the best. Keep moist and protected until established.

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Wedding Bush
Ricinocarpos pinifolius

Flowers: September to November.



H 1-2.5m x W 1-2m.

An attractive shrub that flowers in a mass of white flowers. Male and female flowers are on the same bush. Found across the sandbelt on sandy soils. Rarely grown because of difficulties in propagation.

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Large Kangaroo Apple
Solanum laciniatum


Flowers: September - March.



H 1-3m x W 1-3m.

Attractive very fast growing large shrub with dark green on the upper surface of the leaf & pale green underneath. Plentiful blue to purple flowers with bright yellow centers. Egg shaped fruit turning from green to yellow & to red when ripe. Takes well to pruning. Will tolerate most soil types & conditions. ideal as a quick growing screen plant. Considered to be short lived (4 to 6 years). Hardy once established. Solanum species are colonisers of disturbed areas.

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Trachymene or Wild Parsnip
Trachymene composita

Flowers: September to December.



H 30cm flowerheads to 1.5m+ x W 1.5m

Lush leafy plant found in the sandy soils of the heathlands & woodlands. Attractive round white composite flowers on long stems. Naturally grows where the vegetation has been disturbed. Found in full sun or shady positions, really excels in moist shady areas in early springtime.

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Golden Spray
Viminaria juncea

Flowers: October to February.







H 2.5 - 5m x W 2m.

Slender erect tall shrub to small tree usually forming one trunk with soft weeping branches. Leaves are insignificant but the foliage is attractive. Blooms with long drooping sprays of yellow & red pea flowers. Prefers full sun to semi shade in poorly drained soils around wetlands & moist depressions. Fast growing & amenable to some light pruning. Noted as losing its vigor around the 5 year mark & may become untidy & scrappy. Will grow in drier positions if watered through the dry periods.

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Small Grass-tree
Xanthorrhoea minor

Flowers: November to December.





H 60+cm+ x W 1m.

Although not commonly cultivated, X.minor can make an excellent garden plant. Very hardy, slow growing & long lived. Requiring well drained soils in full sun to dappled shade. Flowers are produced on tall spear-like shaft/s with masses of small creamy-yellow nectar rich flowers. Some sources estimate that flowering can be achieved in four years after planting, but it may take longer. X. minor can makes an excellent container plant. Flowers profusely after fires.

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Common Apple-berry
Billardiera mutabilis




Low climber - 300mm - 2m
Flowers: June to January
.

A twining scrambler that tends to grow-up through nearby shrubs, but not vigorous enough to smother its host. Will form a small tangled ground cover if isolated. Flowers are attractive yellow to green & bell shaped. Its fruit is oblong & noted as being edible when ripe. When soft enough to eat they fall from their stems. Apple-berry likes well-drained light soils, growing in semi-shade, often in more open positions. Requires moist soil around the root zone. Could make a excellent hanging basket plant.

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Love Creeper
Comesperma volubile



Flowers: September - December.

A spectacular delicate twining creeper with stems 1–2m long, leafless or sparsely leaved. Usually found in the more shaded areas on well drained soils. Lovely blue/purple flowers in spring. Usually goes unnoticed until in flower. Difficult to cultivate.

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Small-leaved Clematis
Clematis microphylla var. microphylla







Flowers: July to November.

Vigorous & very showy climber with masses of cream starry flowers. Suits well drained moist to dry soils, also found growing in sandy coastal habitats. Male and female flowers develop on different plants. The female plants develops attractive white feathery plumes persisting to summer. Consider planting next to mature Blackwood or Lightwood for a natural trellis. Can be successfully trained up trellised fences for screening. Reasonably long lived if treated well. Drought resistant, & responds well to supplementary watering in dry positions. Soft foliage & easy to control by pruning.

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Twining Glycine
Glycine clandestina




Flowers: August to November.

Small delicate scrambler or climber with mauve to pale-blue flowers mainly spring through to early summer. Will grow up through neighbouring shrubs; but will not dominate. Pick a moist sheltered position & flowering can be prolonged to summer. Attractive trifoliate leaves of different sizes to 40mm long. Usually goes unnoticed till flowering. Will add a welcome dimension to any native garden setting.


Purple Coral-pea

Hardenbergia violacea



 

Flowers: July to November.

Scrambler/climber, usually with mauve to purple flowers although white & pink flowers have been recorded. Needs well drained moist to dry soils. Can be grown as a scrambling shrub in open positions. The sandbelt form has deep-purple flowers with green centres; sometimes with ovate leaves. The local sandbelt plant is less vigorous but lives longer than its commercialize hybrid form called 'Happy Wanderer'. The indigenous form will climb 2+ metres tall, grow next to a tall shrub to act as natural trellis works very well.

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Chocolate Lily

Arthropodium strictum

Flowers: September to December.





H 30-80cm x W 20-60cm.

Attractive small to medium lily with mauve to purple flowers. Suited to moist well drained soils. Grows in full sun to part shade. Flowers produce a pleasing sweet chocolate scent. Usually completely dies back over summer & re-appears in late winter/springtime from underground tubers. Occasional watering will produce a more lush plant & a longer flowering time. Needs protecting from snails & slugs.

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Bulbine-lily

Bulbine bulbosa

Flowers: September to January.




H 20-60cm x W 30cm.

Small to medium lily with bright yellow flowers. Suited to moist well drained soils. Grows in full sun to part shade. Looks attractive planted in groups. Bulbine-lilies are soft delicate plants & will need protection from damage. Fast growing with a long a flowering time. Watering will produce a bigger more robust plant with a longer flowering period. Keep some clear soil areas around the plants as it will self-sow prolifically. Protect from slugs & snails.

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Common Fringe-lily
Thysanotus tuberosus ssp. tuberosus

Flowers: October to December.




H 30cm x W 40cm
.

Widespread in grasslands and woodland. Plant in well drained sunny positions. The mauve flowers are about 25 mm diameter. Fringe lilies are not often seen in cultivation despite their obvious beauty. Suited to growing in a container. Each flower last for one day, but new flowers continue to be produced through spring.


Twining Fringe-lily

Thysanotus patersonii

Flowers: August to November.



H 1m x W 1m
.

A very delicate little climber or scrambling lily, its twisting leafless stem winds around vegetation, or in the absence of suitable vegetation, trails along the ground. Produces very pretty fringed purple/mauve flowers at the end of its branches. Prefers well drained sandy to medium loamy soils. Needs protection from disturbances.

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Small Flower Flax-lily

Dianella revoluta var. brevicaulis

Flowers: September to December.




H 30-50cm x W 30-50cm.

A tufting plant with strappy foliage. Pale blue flowers appearing among the strappy leaves, these are followed by bright-blue berries. Prefers full sun to part shade and can cope in a range of soil types, provided the soils are well drained. Long lived and tolerant to frost & drought and can cope with coastal conditions. An attractive versatile plant well worth using in gardens, rockeries or beside pathways.

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Black-anther Flax-lily

Dianella revoluta var. revoluta

Flowers: Flowers: August to May.






H 50-90cm x W Spreading up to 1m.

Generally a trouble-free clumping lilly, spreads by rhizomes, but easy to contain. Reasonably fast growing & very drought tolerant once established. Grows in full sun to shade & suitable for most well drained soils. Makes a lovely understorey plant. Flowers are an attractive star shape; blue with black and yellow centres, appearing in spring, summer & autumn. Followed by fleshy shiny purple berries. Removing the dried-out flower stems improves the appearance. Very hardy & long lived. Looks good planted in groups. Suitable for rockeries. Long lived.

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Pale or Smooth Flax-lily

Dianella longifolia var. longifolia

Flowers: August to January.







H 50-80cm x W Spreading up to 50cm.

Pale or Smooth Flax-lily forms a loose tuft with long strap-like leaves. Produces clusters of small pale blue star-shaped flowers on tall stems that may reach a metre high. Followed by blue/purple berries. Suitable for moist well drained soils in full sun to shaded positions. Like most Dianella species they can be divided once the clump is large. Responds well to extra watering in summer. Drought tolerant once established. Its cousin D. tasmanica is noted as being salt tolerant.

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Long Purple Flag

Patersonia occidentalis

Flowers: September to January.





H 20-40cm x W 30cm.

Tufted lilly with very attractive purple flowers on long stems. Prefers lighter soils in moist to wetter areas. Will grow in full sun to shady positions. Fairly tolerant of long dry conditions. Do not let dry out completely. Flowers are short lived, daily, but are produced in abundance. Suitable for pond surrounds and damper areas. Delicate root system so be extra careful when planting, keep moist till established. Usually available at local indigenous nurseries.

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Grass Trigger-plant
Stylidium graminfolium

Flowers: August to January.

 

 

 


H 20 - 60cm x W 20 - 30cm.

Tufted, grass-like plant with long narrow leaves & attractive pink flowers on long stems. Prefers well drained soils in sunny or semi shade positions. Hardy once established. "Trigger-plant" has a unique pollinating method, each flower has a cocked flower column which is triggered by insect visitors. The trigger remains cocked until an insect probes the flower and then springs upwards and deposits pollen on the insect. Good plant for adding colour to a rockery or mixing in with grasses to make a grassy- heathland setting.

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Yellow Rush-lily
Tricoryne elatior

Flowers: October to March.

 


H 30 - 50cm x W 30 - 50cm.

Wiry inconspicuous plant usually going unnoticed until flowering. Very slender, multiple branched with a few grass-like leaves at the base & bright yellow star-shaped flowers 6 to 12 mm in size. Found growing in localized patches in the sandblet remnants on the moist well drained to dryer soils of the grassy woodlands areas. Blooms open on sunny afternoons, flowering period last from spring throughout summer.

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Red-anther or Silvertop
Wallaby
-grass
Joycea pallida

 

Flowers: October to March.




H 3cm x Seed heads to 1m.

Wallaby-grasses adds great charm to any bushland garden or rockery; with many species found across the sandbelt. Good at adapting to their immediate conditions & will form small tuffs to medium size tussocks if conditions are ideal. Most prefers well drained soils in full sun to part shade. Most species flower in spring through to summer & some in autumn. Seed heads are usually white & some are fluffy at maturity; producing many seeds. They will self sow fairly readily if the mulch isn't too deep. Drought tolerant but thrive on extra watering. Cutting back after summer, tidies the tussock & promotes new growth.

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Spear grass
Austrostipa spp.

Flowers: September to January.






H 30cm x Seed heads to 1.5m.

The Spear grasses are a very common component in sandy heathlands, in low open forests & along the immediate coastline of south eastern Melbourne. Foliage grows from 10 to 30 cm high with flower stems reaching from 0.5 to 1.5 metres depending on the species. Most species flower in spring to early summer. Flowerheads vary between the species, most have attractive feathery plumes. As the name suggests they produce sharp pointed seeds. Cutting back the tussock after the summer peak is recommended. Position full sun to semi shade & plant in groups for a natural effect. Austrostipa mollis & A. pubinodis should be available through local Indigenous nurseries.

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Plume-grass Dichelachne spp.

The Flora of Melbourne shows four species of Dichelachne indigenous to the Melbourne region. With possibly two occurring in the Elster Creek region, D. crinita has been recorded in bushland remnants in St Kilda, Sandringham, Clayton & Glen Huntly. Both species only differ slightly from one another in appearance, both locals would be suitable for most gardens.

Long-hair plume-grass
Dichelachne crinita

Flowers: November to February.



H 40cm x 1m - W 30-50cm.
Seed heads to 1.5m.


Dichelachne crinita is a perennial grass, forming a slight tuft with attractive feathery flower heads. Prefers well drained soils in full sun to semi shade. Like most grasses Dichelachne will benefit from cutting back after the seedheads have matured. Watering during early summer will keep plume-grass lush and green for longer.

 


Weeping G
rass
Microlaena stipoides

Flowers: September to March.


H 30cm Seed heads to 1m.

Soft lush grass suited to well drained moist soils, thriving in the shaded areas often used to lawn deep shaded areas. Tufting or matting, its size can be variable depending on the local conditions; takes very well to regular mowing. Deep-rooted, hardy & drought tolerant. Self sows & spreads readily to other suitable areas. There are two different forms of Weeping Grass across the sandbelt that vary in height. The seeds often catch in socks & other clothing which can be annoying. Weeping Grass can be very invasive, overgrowning smaller plants, & can be very hard to control in a garden situation

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Common Tussock-grass
Poa labillardieri

Flowers: December to February.





H 30-80cm x W 30-50+cm.
Seed heads to 1+m.

Fast growing attractive large tussock grass with slender grey-green or blue-green leaves. Accepting most conditions, preferring moist areas. Prefers full sun for maximum development of the flower heads. Reasonably long-lived at around 15 years & drought tolerant once established. Trimming the tussock back to 150 mm once a year in early summer stimulates growth and removes excess flammable material. Trimming & then dividing a large tussock in spring is possible. Planting in groups a metre apart will give pleasing results.

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Kangaroo Grass
Themeda triandra

Flowers: October to February.




H 1.5m x W 70cm.

Grows in full sun to part shade on sandy to clay soils & needs little water once established. Leaves develop an orange to red or purple tinge in winter and turn green in spring & summer. The attractive foliage and seed heads make Kangaroo grass ideal as an ornamental in rockeries and native gardens. Like most tussock grasses planting in spaced clumps will give good landscaping values. Kangaroo Grass is long lived.

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Coast Tussock Grass
Poa poiformis var. poiformis

Flowering: September - January.

 

H 20cm to 90cm. - W 1m.

Fast growing coastal grass; a very hardy medium to large symmetrical tussock. Will grow in full sun or part shade, in wet or dry conditions & in well drained soils. Cutting back in autumn will keep it looking neat & fresh. Can be a little prickly on bare legs. Tolerates salt spray making it an ideal plant for the immediate coast area.

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Clustered Everlasting
Chrysocephalum apiculatum


Flowers: September to January.


H 20 - 30 x W 10 - 20cm.

Grey to green leaves with clusters of small yellow daisy-like flowers. Flowers can be picked & kept as everlasting. Grows in full sun to semi shade. Can withstand periods of dryness but does best with supplementary watering. Suitable for most soil types. Planting in groups amongst indigenous grasses can give a pleasing wildflower effect. Clustered Everlasting can be cut-back over winter before the new spring growth appears.

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Bent Goodenia
Goodenia geniculata


Flowers: August - February.


H 5-10cm x W 10-50cm.

Attractive trailing or matting plant for rockeries or small groundcover suitable for containers with a long flower time. Prefers moist to dryish well drained soils in full sun to part shaded areas. Bent Goodenia is a very hardy adaptable plant, some care is needed as it is vulnerable to trampling or being overgrown by more vigorous neighbours.

Bundled Guinea-flower
Hibbertia fasciculata

Flowers: can be variable : peaking
September to November
.




H 30-60cm x W 40cm.

Low growing shrub with attractive soft foliage and golden yellow flowers. Prefers well drained sandy soils with full sun to dappled shade. Mixes well with smaller grasses, lilies & shrubs. Moderately fast growing if kept moist through dry periods until established. Grows well under some of the more open sparse shrubs like some of the Acacia's or dwarf Allocasuarina.

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Common Hovea
Hovea linearis


Flowers: August - October.




H 30-60cm x W 30cm.

Delicate slender upright plant with purple/mauve or sometimes white flowers. Olive coloured long slender leaves, while the lower leaves are oval-shaped. H. linearis is hard to see among the grasses & larger plants until in flower. Prefers well drained soils. Does well on the fringes of planted areas where it get partial sun and less competition.

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Jersey Cudweed
Helichrysum luteoalbum

Flowers for most of the year.

 

H 20-50cm.

Erect, grayish woolly perennial or annual herb. Flowers cream to yellow, with no petals. Crowded flower heads in tight clusters at the ends of the stems, leaving fluffy bracts when flowers are gone. Tolerant of full sun to shady positions. Looks attractive planted among your grasses & lilies or shrubs. Self seeds readily, but easy to control.

Slender Bush-pea
Pultenaea tenuifolia

Flowers: September to October.



H 10 - 50cm x W 10 - 30cm.

Very attractive small slender twiggy shrub, with narrow, leaves & yellow and red tinged flowers in tight groups at end of stems. Requires moist well drained soils. Sunny to semi-shaded areas suite the best. Keep moist & protected until established.

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Bluebell  Wahlenbergia spp.        

There are eight species of Bluebell Wahlenbergia across the Melbourne region, with five recorded on the sandbelt.
W. gracilis, W. stricta, W. luteola, W. multicaulis & W. gracilenta.
Most looking similar to the casual observer. Often
going unnoticed among the grasses until their blue flowers appear. Perennial or annual in habit, with a long
flowering period throughout spring & summer.

Australian or Sprawling Bluebell
Wahlenbergia gracilis

Flowers: November to May.



H 10 - 50cm x W 15 - 40cm.


Quick growing with masses of small blue flowers on twining wiry stems. Prefers moist to drier soils; responds very well if watered occasionally. Prefers part shade, but can cope with full sun. Will readily self-sow if areas of bare soil are near. Plant amoung the Wallaby-grasses the Bluebells wiry stems will twine among the grasses and fill them with splashes of lovely blue flowers. Takes well to being cut back occasionally.

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Tall Bluebell
Wahlenbergia stricta ssp. stricta

Flowers: September to January.




H 30cm x W 15-40cm.

Tall Bluebell has lovely blue flowers & is becoming more widely cultivated & available. Prefering well drained soils & adaptable to most other soil types, in either a sunny or semi-shaded position. For longer flowering & a more lush plant supplementary watering is recommended. Once established Tall Bluebell is very hardy, dying back in summer, reducing to a tuber & re-shooting when the rain comes.

Scrambling Coral Fern
Gleichenia microphylla








Spreading to H 3+ m.

Scrambling Coral Fern reaches its full height by being supported by other vegetation; or by forming a tangled thicket. Growing in shaded permently waterlogged soils, along drainage-lines or in cool sheltered gullies in or around heathlands eucalypt forests & woodland. Scrambling Coral Fern is hardy & can tolerate salt laden winds in coastal environs. Will not tolerate its root zone completely drying out. Rare in cultivation & is almost extinct across the Sandbelt.

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Austral Bracken
Pteridium esculentum

 

Flowers: August - October.







H to 1.5 but usually around 60cm - 1 m. Spreading

Coarse erect fern with stiff fronds. Fronds are coiled when they first emerge, become harder & darker as they unfurl. Requires well drained soils to flourish, Bracken will form dense patches spreading by underground rhizomes. Considered a troublesome weed & a fire hazard in some rural areas. The fire hazard can be reduced by removing dead fronds and stems. With or without its problems, Bracken is an integral part of the Australian landscape and flourished throughout the sandbelt region, & is still present in most bushland reserves foreshore areas & along some raillines & creeks.

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Bidgee -widgee
Acaena novae-zelandiae


Flowers: October - January.

 



Prostrate x W 1-4m.

A ground-cover plant with soft ferny leaves. Likes full sun to semi-shade & well drained soils, but adapts to wetter areas. Fairly fast growing. May need some watering to remain lush throughout summer. The globular flowerheads dry to a reddish brown & are retained for several months on the plant. Dried seedheads are easily broken into a multitude of small burrs when touched, sticking to socks & pet fur. Keep away from foot-trafficked areas. Recommended not to grow if you have cats or dogs as the burrs can be a nuisance.

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Creeping Bossiaea
Bossiaea prostrata

Flowers: September - October.





Prostrate x W 50cm.-1m.

Delicate wiry stemmed prostrate shrub, often hard to find unless flowering. Prefers full sun to semi shaded areas. Pea-flowers are bright-yellow with orange centres flowering best in an open sunny position. Can be hard to establish and needs protecting from disturbance. Keep moist over the first summer, once established B. postrata can be long-lived and very hardy.


Blushing Bindweed

Convolvulus erubescens

Flowers: August to February.



H prostrate x- W 1-1.5m.

Small attractive scrambler that likes sunny areas. Twines its way through and up grass stems & other small plants, flowering in splashes of pink along its twining path. Mix with established grasses like wallaby grasses. Flowers vary from pale pink to deep pink, with attractive soft green leaves. Can be lush & vigorous if it finds a moist sunny position. Self seeds well.

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Kidney-weed

Dichondra repens

Flowers: September - December.



Prostrate x W 1-2m.

Dense carpeting ground-cover tolerating most soils types; sunny to shady positions. Can be a lawn substitute for light use areas, & takes well to mowing. The kidney-shaped leaves are about three centimetres across. The flowers are small and inconspicuous. Excellent for rockeries or in between stepping-stone pathways. A hardy and adaptable plant that thrives in moist semi-shade areas.

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Running Postman
Kennedia prostrata

Flowers: April to December.

 

Prostrate spreading 1 - 2.5m.

Attractive trailing ground cover with bright red flowers on stringy runners up to or over 1 metre plus long. Prefers a open sunny position or dappled shade in moist well drained soils, will do well in drier areas if watered & not left to dry-out. Noted as an excellent plant for growing in rockeries on embankments & in hanging baskets. Light pruning can be beneficial. Can be short lived, but Running Postman is a delight to have around.

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Ivy-leaf Violet
Viola hederacea

Flowers: for most of the year.



H 15cm x W 1-2m.

This is our local Violet which has small odorless white & purple flowers on stems to 15cm. Thrives & flowers in shady areas & needs moist well drained soils. Fast growing & spreads quickley if conditions are favorable. Likely to need watering to remain lush throughout summer. Suitable for rockeries & baskets. Easily divided to plant in other parts of your garden. Good for pond edges or water-gardens & most other moist or shaded garden areas.

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Sand-hill Sword-sedge
Lepidosperma concavum

Flowers: October to January.

H 0.5-60cm x W spreading.

A coarse tufted perennial that grows to 60 cm & likes a open sunny position. Clusters of brown, spikelet/flowers at the top of stems. Prefers sandy soils, including dunal habitat, but will grow on a range of soils & will tolerate wet & dry conditions. Spreads by rhizomes. Will not tolerate phosphorus fertilizer.

Common Bog-rush
Schoenus apogon

Flowers: October to January.

H 5-30cm x W spreading.

Lover of moist to wet soils, prefers open positions or partial shade. Grass-like appearance with attractive seed-heads. Worth considering around a pond edge or in a bog-garden.

Tall Spike Rush
Eleocharis sphacelata

Flowers: November to February.



H 50cm - 2m W Spreading.

 

Large green upright reed, with the flowers/seed heads on the tip of the reed. It is a favourite of water birds for nesting material. Provides protection for fish and birds. Once established it can dominate most other water plants & cover large areas of the water body. Can grow in water 1m to 2m deep. Found in fresh water dams & wetlands.

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Swamp Goodenia
Goodenia humilis

Flowers: November to February.




H 5-10cm Spreading.

The natural habitat of Goodenia humilis is in or around wetlands or areas with wet or poorly drained soils. Swamp Goodenia is a hardy groundcover for moist or poorly drained areas. It can be used successfully around pond edges's and will grow in full or part sun. Abundant bright yellow flowers sit above the foliage in spring to summer with peak flowering occurring January to February.

Swamp Paperbark
Melaleuca ericifolia

Flowers: October to November.




H 2-8m - W 2-3m.

This erect small tree with fine soft foliage occurs naturally along water courses & around wetlands areas, loving water logged areas. It is a very hardy and drought tolerant tree with pale papery bark. It has fragrant creamy-yellow bottlebrush-like flowers & dense fine foliage, making Swamp Paperbark an effective screening tree. Planting in groups improves the aesthetic value of this tree, which is noted as taking well to pruning.

Common Reed
Phragmites australis

Flowers: October to January.


H 1-3+m. Spreading.

Semi-aquatic tall growing reed found along edges of creeks, rivers & in wetlands, especially near the coast. Forms large dense stands. Found in both fresh water & brackish water. The flower heads changes colour with age, turning from pink to silvery-grey.


Cumbungi
or Bullrush
Typha domingensis


Flowers: all year.

 




H 1-3+m. Spreading.

Fast growing semi-aquatic to aquatic plant found along wetland edges in stationary or slow-flowing water to 1m deep. Naturally occurring in fresh or brackish waters. Will not tolerate long periods of drying out. Known for its attractive velvety cinnamon-brown seed heads that becoming silky & fluffy when mature. Cumbungi spread vegetatively from rhizomes or wind dispersed seeds. Bullrush is very vigorous & will colonise all suitable habitat. Once considered a weed, now reconised for its beneficial habitat values & for slowing storm water flow, capturing sediment & protecting erosion prone area in our waterways.

Purple Loosestrife
Lythrum salicaria

 

Flowers: November to March.


H 1-2m x W 1m.


Very showy with its tall purple to magenta flowers. Purple Loosestrife is fast growing semi-aquatic plant. Growing multiple stems from a perennial rootstock. Now found in the sandbelt region. Usually found fringing waterways, wetlands & floodplains habitat. Suitable for bog gardens, & water features. Cutting back the stems at ground level after flowering is noted as a good practice. Will form dense stands making good habitat for water small birds & young fish.

Running Marsh-flower
Villarsia reniformis

Flowers: September to November.



H 40cm to W 1m.

Grows in temporary or permanent pools in wetlands usually less than 50cm deep, or in moist depressions, dying back when water recedes. Leaves are shiny green, round or kidney-shaped, which float on the water surface. Likes, full sun, semi shade to heavy shaded areas. Can be grown in the ground if kept damp. Perfect for ponds, wet soils around pond edges, or bog-gardens. Bright yellow flowers on stems to a metre high.


Coast Wattle

Acacia longifolia
subsp. sophorae

 

Flowers: July to November.




H 1-3+ m x Spreading to 8m

Large spreading tangled shrub to 5 metres high & 8 metres or more wide. Flat green to yellowish oblong phyllodes (flattened stems that appear leaf-like). Attractive lemon-yellow rod-shaped flower spikes to 5cm in length. Seed pods are light brown and often curved. Original habitat coastal dunes or immediate surrounds, cliff tops etc. Fast growing, hardy species, often used to protect sand dunes from erosion. If planted in a garden allow plenty of room as A.longifolia will sprawl over any other shrubs & other plants in its vicinity.

This plant is highly invasive to local bushland remnants; consider not planting away from immediate coastal areas.

Drooping or Coast She-oak
Allocasuarina verticillata

 

Flowers: March to December.

 

H 4-11m x W 3-6+m.

Small to medium spreading tree with separate male & female individuals. Has a weeping habit & delicate grey-green pine-like foliage. Tolerant of dry sandy soils. Does very well in immediate coastal areas; salt spray tolerant. The male tree develops yellow-brown flower spikes giving the tree a very attractive hue. Females develops barrel shaped woody seed cones. The shed foliage forms a weed-smothering soft carpet. Very drought resistant. An excellent shade tree once established.

Sea Box
Alyxia buxifolia

Flowers: October to February.



H 1-2m - 1-3m.

Small to medium compact shrub to 2m tall. Smooth leaves arranged opposite to each other on stems. Flowers are white & scented in scattered clusters followed by attractive red fruit in Autumn. Confined to coastal environment on well drained soils. Very hardy, salt tolerant and often sculpted by prevailing coastal winds. The fruit is noted as being toxic to humans.

Coast or Grey Saltbush
Atriplex cinerea

Flowering: August - March.



H 1-2m. - W 2-3m.

Large coastal spreading shrub with separate male and female plants. Tolerates full sun to part shaded areas in well drained soils & thrives on coastal sands, growing almost to the high tide mark. Making it ideal for frontline dune erosion control. Fast growing & may need to be trimmed fairly often in gardens. Commonly grown for its attractive silvery foliage.

Coast Banksia
Banksia integrifolia subsp. integrifolia

 

Flowers: Anytime of the year, but mostly between February to September.

 


H 10-20m x W 4-8m.

Robust attractive medium to large tree, usually found on coastal sands behind the primary dune front & cliff tops. Suited to most well drained sandy soils. Reasonably fast growing & providing birds & insects with nectar. The leaves are green on top, silver on the underside. Typically the tree has flowers at different development stages from young candles in soft green, to immature flowers in fresh lime green & the mature bottle-brush flowers in yellow. The tree retains its woody seed cones. B. integrifolia will tolerate full coastal exposure. Drought tolerant once established.

Sticky Boobialla
Myoporum viscosum

Flowering: August - December.



H 0.5-2m. - W 1.5-2m.

Attractive medium shrub with beautiful flowers, naturally found on exposed coastal cliffs or drier areas further inland. Tolerating salt exposure & frosts. Light pruning recommended to keep it from becoming straggly. The fruit is noted as being edible.


Karkalla

Carpobrotus rossii

Flowering: August - January.


Prostrate, spreading to 2m+

A prostrate plant, with thick succulent leaves, common along the coastline & dunes. A popular bush tucker plant, as both leaves & fruit are noted as being edible. This unusual & most attractive groundcover plant is hardy & drought tolerant preferring well drained sandy areas in full sun to semi shade. Very well suited to exposed coastal conditions. Propagation is easily carried out from cuttings.


White Correa

Correa alba

Flowers: for most of the year.




H 50cm-2m - W 1- 2+m.

Low growing shrub with attractive white star-like flowers. Naturally found in the immediate coastal environment & cliffs tops. Best suited to well drained sands found along the coast. Once established White Correa is tolerant of extended dryness & successful in most reasonably drained soils in full sun or semi shade. Resistant to salt spray. Takes well to pruning & shaping. Correa alba has proved to be a versatile & popular plant, & flowers for most of the year.

Coast Sword-sedge
Lepidosperma gladiatum

Flowering: Most of the year.

 

H 1+. - W Spreading.

Robust tufting sedge with shiny sharp edged leaves usually found growing in stable secondary sand dune areas & coastal scrub. Drought & salt tolerant. Chaffy brown spiky flowers on flattened stems. Hard shiny nuts follow the pale brown flowers. Noted as clump-forming to 3m (though typically it is smaller)


Coast Tea-tree
Leptospermum laevigatum

Flowers: August to October.




H 2-8m x W 2-4m.

Coastal growing tree. Prefers well drained coastal sands. Drought tolerant once established. Noted to live over 100 years. A hardy species with bee-attracting white flowers. Has proven to be invasive in bushland remnants with well drained sandy soils further inland from its natural coastal habitat. Can be pruned & is easily trained & shaped. The twisting gnarled trunk & branches makes an very interesting tree.

Coast Beard-heath
Leucopogon parviflorus

Flowering: June - November.

H 1-5m. - W 2-3m.

Coastal shrub or small tree found along the immediate coast on all well drained sands or soils, stunted in exposed positions. Masses of highly scented flowers followed by tiny sweet edible fruit. Attractive bark on older plants. A favourite with birds.

Coast Daisy-Bush
Olearia axillaris

 

Flowering: February - April.

 

H 1-2m. - W 1-2m.

A large, soft, bushy grey shrub growing to 2 metres. The small silvery aromatic leaves are crowded by tiny yellow flowers during Autumn. Naturally grows in coastal dunes. Tolerant of strong winds, salt, & poor soils. Can be pruned & formed into a hedge.

Coast Tussock Grass
Poa poiformis var. poiformis

Flowering: September - January.

H 20cm to 90cm. - W 1m.

Very hardy fast growing coastal grass; medium to large symmetrical tussock. Grows in full sun or part shade & either wet or dry conditions in well drained soils. Cutting back in autumn will keep it looking neat & fresh. Can be a little prickly on bare legs. Tolerates salt spray making it an ideal plant for the immediate coastal area.

Coast Swainson-pea
Swainsona lessertiifolia

 

 

Flowering: June - September.

Open scrambling shrub - H 10 x 40cm - 1m.

A handsome sprawling small shrub with rich purple pea-flowers & attractive soft foliage. Usually found in or around coastal dune communities. Requiring a sunny position with well drained yellow sandy soils or black sandy soils, well suited to dunes or coastal grassland or the sunny fringes around plantings. Will cope with dry condition once established & salt is tolerant. Now fairly rare around the Port Phillip Bay area.

Slender Bush-pea
Pultenaea tenuifolia

Flowers: September to October.



H 10 - 50cm x W 10 - 30cm.

Pultenaea tenuifolia is an uncommon trailing to prostrate shrub, found in Banksia woodland & dune scrub. It has blunt hairy leaves & solitary yellow & red flowers. Needs well drained sandy soils.

Seaberry Saltbush
Rhagodia candolleana


Flowering: December - March.

H 2m. - W 1-2+m.

Coastal salt-tolerant scrambling shrub with small semi-succulent leaves. Grows low & dense & will vigorously weave its way through & up neighbouring shrubs. Can be easily pruned to keep it neat & orderly. It produces small dark-red glossy fruit that are a good food source for small native birds and lizards. Drought tolerance.

Hairy Spinifex
Spinifex sericeus

 

Flowering: February to August.

Branched to several metres long.

Spiniflex is a long lived rhizomic grass & is important as a first-line coastal colonizer able to bind loose sands with its long runners & extensive root system. Commonly found on & around coastal dunes, at times spreading almost to the high tide mark. The flowers detaches when mature & become wind driven tumbleweeds. Spiniflex with tolerate very exposed immediate coastal conditions.

Bower Spinach
Tetragonia implexicoma

Flowering: June - November.

 

H Prostrate .5 - W 2m.

Prostrate trailing or scrambling plant with yellow flowers & thick, glossy bright green diamond shaped leaves, which are edible. Adaptable to many soils, but prefers sandy coastal soils in an open sunny or partly shaded position.